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Sunday, April 09, 2017

FUNDING: The right time to help the right whales



It's the right time to help right whales.



The arithmetic for one of the world's most endangered whales isn't good. North Atlantic right whales are having a tough year.  Just three calves were born, and four whales - including the 2016 calf of right whale #1281, Punctuation, pictured below - have been confirmed dead in the last 12 months, with three of those deaths caused by entanglement or ship strike. 
 

Every day, this tiny population of just 524 individuals faces increasing threats, from entanglement in fishing gear and ship collisions, to pollution and climate change affecting the waters they rely on to survive.

Christy Hudak and Tim Famulare collecting zooplankton samples from Cape Cod Bay
Each winter and spring, our stellar right whale team, under the leadership of Charles "Stormy" Mayo, PhD, Director of the Right Whale Ecology Program, collects data on as many as 50% of the population:  By air and by sea, we assess the unique conditions of Cape Cod Bay that bring these endangered whales back each year; locate and identify individuals; and monitor the whales' health and behaviors. 

We raise the alarm if a whale is entangled, so that we can direct our world-renowned disentanglement team to the scene, and send real-time reports of whale sightings to government officials, the Coast Guard and others, to alert vessels to slow down or change direction to steer clear of animals. 

This season, cuts to our budget have restricted our ability to work. 

R/V Shearwater and the CCS                                                            habitat crew underway in Cape Cod Bay, photographed                                                            by the CCS aerial crew aboard the NESAS survey plane, Skymaster
We've had to slash our days at sea to just five, down from an average of ten in the past, and we are limited in the number of survey flights                                                            we can take over the Bay and the Outer Cape. 


Each 10-hour research cruise costs $2,000. An average aerial survey is $4,000. Can you donate $200 to pay for an hour of sea time?  Or $400 for an hour of flight time? 
For your gift of $200 or more, we'll send you a                                                            right whale photo, suitable for framing, selected and autographed by members of our intrepid right whale team. For your gift of any amount, we'll send you our thanks, on behalf of Stormy, our entire right whale crew, and the three new calves. 

Please CLICK HERE to make a donation, or contact our Director of Development, Deb Magee, at 845-926-2176. You may also mail your gift to the Center at 5 Holway Avenue, Provincetown, MA 02657.

It's a boy! 2017 calf of right whale 1012, Pediddle, rolling and tail slapping in Cape Cod Bay 
Thank you                                                          
for keeping us in the air and on the water.

 
Two of the three right whale calves born this year were spotted in Cape Cod Bay on Monday, April 3! Please consider making a donation today to help us continue to monitor and protect this new generation.

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