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Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Stopping Ship-Whale Collisions


A detection system picks up the calls of right whales and warns ships.

By Anna Davison
By listening for the calls of right whales in the waters of New England, researchers are helping ships avoid the endangered animals.
Ten whale detection buoys are now in place in the busy shipping lanes leading into Boston Harbor, a hot spot for ship strikes. When the buoys pick up the calls of North Atlantic right whales, warnings are sent to ships in the area so that they slow down. It's the first time that a listening system has been coupled with real-time warnings.
"I have been just immeasurably excited and impressed about how well it's worked," saysChristopher Clark, a senior scientist at Cornell University, who helped develop the system. Spring is the busiest season for right whales in the waters of New England. "For the last couple of months, it's just been bonkers," Clark says. "There's a lot more going on out here in the shipping lanes than we ever thought."
The buoys were installed at the beginning of the year in Massachusetts Bay as part of the licensing requirements for a liquefied natural gas (LNG) import facility 13 miles east of Boston. The area is both a popular hangout for right whales and part of the route for LNG tankers and ships headed to and from Boston. LNG tankers are required to slow to 10 knots if right whales are detected in the area.
"We think it's working extremely well," says David Wiley, research coordinator for the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. "The detections are being sent out, and we know the LNG ships are slowing down" at the mouth of the bay.
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1 comment:

  1. Last winter the right whales congregated just north of Cape Cod ... right in the ship lanes. Take a look at the NOAA map right now (October 29, 2008). There are 29 still reported off Grand Manan but the others are starting to show up back at the Cape in their old feeding grounds. Hopefully bioacoustics will be the ticket to keep strikes and mortalities down.

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